Part 11: Update, Backup and Restore SDN Environment

Previous Post in Series:  Part 10: Deploy and Configure SDN Software Load Balancer Service

Welcome to part 11 of my Server 2016 Features Series, I thought it was worth posting on this one because I managed to brick my SDN environment (in my lab) because I just went for it without following any real process…COME ON, we’ve all done it Smile

There won’t be much new in here that Greg Cusanza at MS hasn’t covered in the great documentation he uploaded recently, so if nothing else, you’ll get a similar experience to that but with a slight Scottish flavour Smile

At the time of writing, backup and restore of SDN was introduced in the most recent Cumulative Update, and as I alluded to earlier, getting this piece wrong can break your SDN environment, so it’s important that you get it right.

OK, that’s enough scaremongering…let’s get to it. Continue reading “Part 11: Update, Backup and Restore SDN Environment”

Part 10: Deploy and Configure SDN Software Load Balancer Service

Previous Post in Series: Part 9: Deploy and Configure SDN Network Controller Service

Welcome to part 10 of my Server 2016 Features series. This guide will continue on from parts 8 and 9 where we learned a little about SDN v2 in Server 2016 and deployed our multi node Network Controller service (which is a prerequisite for our Software Load Balancer service). Going forward, I’ll be referring to our Software Load Balancer service as the SLB or SLB/MUX Smile

As with the Network Controller service, this deployment will be done using a multi node (3 nodes) Service Template deployed by SCVMM.

Here’s a list of the tasks we’ll be covering:

With no further ado, let’s get to it. Continue reading “Part 10: Deploy and Configure SDN Software Load Balancer Service”

Part 9: Deploy and Configure SDN Network Controller Service

Previous Post in Series: Part 8:  Server 2016 Software Defined Networking Overview

Welcome to part 9 in the series folks, if you’ve not read the overview guide (at the link above), it’s worth doing that before continuing on to the deployment phase as reading it may shape some of your design decisions etc.

Here is a list of the main steps that we’ll be covering in this guide:

Continue reading “Part 9: Deploy and Configure SDN Network Controller Service”

Part 8: Server 2016 Software Defined Networking Overview

Previous Post in Series: Part 7: Expose Shielded VMs to Windows Azure Pack Portal

Welcome back folks, in part 8 of my Server 2016 Features Series I’ll be providing an overview of SDN v2. This was originally going to be a single post but as I started working on the overview, I realised it would be a bit of a beast by the end.  It’s for that reason I’ve decided to split SDN into 3 post, which are:

  • SDN v2 Overview
  • Network Controller Service deployment
  • Software Load Balancer Service deployment

The deployment and configuration pieces will be covered in parts 9 and 10.  As such, I assume that at the very least you’ve deployed a 3 node Hyper-V cluster on Server 2016 and it’s managed by the latest version of SCVMM. Continue reading “Part 8: Server 2016 Software Defined Networking Overview”

Part 7: Expose Shielded VMs to Windows Azure Pack Portal

Previous Post in Series: Part 6: Deploy and Configure Shielded VMs Using SCVMM

Welcome to part 7 of the Server 2016 Features Series. In the last two sections we deployed a Guarded Fabric and set things up to allow us to deploy Shielded VMs from within SCVMM. This section of the guide will build on that by exposing the Shielded VM capability to the Windows Azure Pack portal.

This guide assumes that you already have a WAP server up and running and connected to SCVMM via SPF, if you’ve yet to do this, I’ve put together a guide on it HERE

Here’s a quick list of what will be covered in this guide:

  • Create a Shielded VM Template in SCVMM
  • Create a VM Cloud in SCVMM
  • Create a plan and user in WAP Admin Portal
  • Deploy a shielded VM from template within the WAP Portal

Continue reading “Part 7: Expose Shielded VMs to Windows Azure Pack Portal”

Set Custom URLs for WAP Admin and Tenant Sites

Hello again folks, I just recently put up a guide on deploying WAP and SPF and thought this little addition would be useful.

The first thing I wanted to do when I spun up my first WAP server was to have the admin and tenant sites respond over port 443 and change the URLs to something more friendly. I was very happy to find out that this is something that can be done without “too” much effort Smile

The first thing you’ll want to do is decide on the URLs for each of the sites listed in the table below. Once that decision has been made, you’ll want to add them into DNS, for the purposes of this guide I’m doing this all internally but the theory is the same for making these sites available to the internet. Continue reading “Set Custom URLs for WAP Admin and Tenant Sites”

Add Additional Administrators to WAP Admin Portal

Hi folks, I thought I’d throw up a quick guide of this one for the sake of completeness after posting my WAP deployment guide.

So you’ve got WAP up and running and have done all your testing etc. You’re looking to add some additional administrators to the admin portal and can’t for the life of your find out where to do that. Don’t worry, it’s not you, apparently this cannot be done from within the portal itself and needs to be done by inserting users into the WAP database via PowerShell. Continue reading “Add Additional Administrators to WAP Admin Portal”

Deploy Windows Azure Pack (Express) Step-by-Step

Hello again folks, if you’ve been following this blog since it launched, you’ll be aware that I’ve been writing a series I’m calling the Server 2016 Features Series. Part of this series is exposing the Shielded VM capability to the Windows Azure Pack portal. I’m working on the assumption that some people may never have deployed WAP before, and so decided to put a guide together for it. As this guide isn’t technically part of the above series, I’ll also be including the components required for a successful minimal viable deployment of WAP Express (single server). Here is a high level of the tasks covered:

  • Deploy and configure a SQL Server 2016 VM
  • Deploy and configure a Service Provider Foundation Server
  • Deploy and configure a Windows Azure Pack Server

Continue reading “Deploy Windows Azure Pack (Express) Step-by-Step”

Deploy and Configure a SCVMM Library Server on SOFS

Hi folks, I recently noticed that I was referring to a SCVMM library server in my Server 2016 Features Series but neglected to create a guide for said library server…how rude of me. Please allow me to rectify that Smile

When deploying a highly available instance of SCVMM, you can’t have the installer create the share for you, if you’ve been following the above series though, you’ve also deployed a scale-out file server, so why not put your SCVMM library share there?

There is one massive benefit to this method (you’re getting it in bold folks). When deploying a VM from a SOFS hosted library share to the SOFS shares for your Hyper-V environment, the data copy is all done within SOFS over your SMB network(s). This means that the traffic doesn’t touch your management network and in fact, won’t even leave the Top of Rack switch (assuming both your Hyper-V hosts and SOFS nodes are connected to the same). Continue reading “Deploy and Configure a SCVMM Library Server on SOFS”

Part 6: Deploy and Configure Shielded VMs Using SCVMM

Previous Post in Series:  Part 5:  Deploy and Configure the Host Guardian Service

Welcome to Part 6 of the Server 2016 Features Series. In this section we’re going to configure all necessary resources to enable us to deploy shielded VMs on our guarded fabric.  You’ll need to have already configured a library server within SCVMM, if you’ve yet to do this, I’ve documented the process HERE

You can jump to any of the sections covered in this post using the links below:

Continue reading “Part 6: Deploy and Configure Shielded VMs Using SCVMM”